how to use Brolls

If you’re not using Broll in your current videos then this is going to be the most valuable video you’ll probably ever watch.  Get ready to have an epiphany that changes your ability to create incredible videos that keep viewers watching.  I wasn’t going to do it, but I decided to spill all the beans in this video.  I’m giving out my secrets and these secrets if you follow them are going to allow you to easily turn any boring video into a views magnet.

First, let’s talk about what is a b-roll.

 B-roll is an old school. It dates all the way back to the old film industry term where these shots come from a second camera. The main camera which shoots the main footage has its films labeled as A-rolls.

how to add Brolls

(How b-roll is edited.)

 

Throughout the history of cinema, there have been notable directors mastering  B-roll to enhance the experience of their movies. Martin Scorcese, Akira Kurosawa and Steven Spielberg all have used b-rolls effectively.

Akira Kurosawa’s & Samurai in 1954 showed some early use of b-rolls to make a movie more engaging. 

 

Additionally, 

whether it’s a vlog, a documentary, interview or a short film, B-rolls make the difference in making your videos interesting and help tell your story.
Now, with YouTube primarily a platform for videos, YouTubers have come to adopt the use of B-rolls.  

And B-rolls come in different types which also gives out different effects to a viewer

Types of B-roll footage can include:

  • Slow motion cinematic shots of locations or inanimate objects
  • Slow motion of people talking, laughing, staring, anything really
  • Establishing shots
  • Dramatic reenactments
  • Screencasts
  • Stock footage
  • Storytelling footage

 

Virtually anything that isn’t part of the main camera shot is a b-roll.

 

 3 reasons why it makes your videos better 

 

1- It makes your storytelling better:

  • Adding b-rolls help in explaining things.
  • You can show what the speaker is talking about 
  • Showing a different angle gives viewers a different perspective of the story

2- You can use it as a filler:

  • useful in covering shooting mistakes like camera shake
  • bad change in lighting
  • speaker or actors having bad posture 
  • to cover bad cuts

3- Can help in transitions:

All great editors often times use b-roll to help in transitioning to a different scene. 

This helps in establishing characters or settings.

 

All of this is furthermore demonstrated and explained in a short film ( yes, Augie showed some acting skills) and demonstration on how to use b-rolls.